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Traditional Dance & Musical

Traditional musical instruments in widespread use include the massinko, a one-stringed violin played with a bow; the krar, a six-stringed lyre, played with the fingers or a plectrum; the washint, a simple flute; and three types of drum – the negarit (kettledrum), played with sticks, the kebero, played with the hands, and the atamo, tapped with the fingers or palm. Other instruments include the begena, a huge, multi-stringed lyre often referred to as the Harp of David; the tsinatseil, or sistrum, which is used in church music; the meleket, a long trumpet without fingerholes, and the embilta, a large, simple, one-note flute used on ceremonial occasions.

Though often simply made, the massinko can, in the hands of an expert musician, produces a wide variety of melodies. It is often played by wandering minstrels,particularly near eating houses, where the musicians entertain the diners. The rousing rhythms of the negarit were used in times gone by to accompany important proclamations, and chiefs on the march would be preceded by as many as 30 men, each beating a negarit carried on a donkey.

The tiny atamo is most frequently played at weddings and festivals, setting the rhythmic beat of folk songs and dances. Modern-style bands have come into existence in recent decades, and there are noted Ethiopian jazz musicians.

The Bale Mountains National Park

Is a national park in the Oromia Region of southeast Ethiopia. Created in 1970, this park covers about 2,200 square kilometers of the Bale Mountains, Rising to a height of more than 4,000 meters, the range borders Ethiopias southern highlands, whose highest peak, Mount TulluDeemtu, stands at 4,377 meters.

The establishment of the 2,400-square-kilometre Bale mountain national park was crucial to the survival of the mountain Nyala, Meneliks bushbuck and the Simien red fox. This fox is one of the most colorful members of the dog family and more abundant here than anywhere else in Ethiopia. All three endemic animals thrive in this environment, the Nyala in particular often being seen in large numbers.

The Bale Mountains offer some fine high-altitude horse and foot trekking, and the streams of the park – which become important rivers further downstream – are well-stocked with rainbow and brown trout.

Simien Mountains National Park

Semien Mountains National park is the home of the endemic mammals of Walia Ibex, Semien Fox, Gelada Baboons and many species of birds and plants apart from its spectacular scenic beauty. And also the perfect trekking area, located in the North Gondar Zone of the Amhara Region, covers 179 square kilometers of highland area at an average elevation of 3,300 meters.

RasDashen, at 4,620 meters the highest peak in Ethiopia, stands adjacent to the park.It is home to a number of extremely rare species, including the Ethiopian wolf, Gelada Baboon, and the Walia Ibex, a wild goat found nowhere else in the world.

More than 50 species of birds inhabit the park, including the impressive Bearded Vulture, or Lammergeyer, with its 10-foot (3m) wingspan.It was one of the first sites to be made a World Heritage Site by UNESCO (1978). However, due to serious population declines of the characteristic native species, in 1996 it was also added to the List of World Heritage Sites in danger. This national park is one of the best sites for those who love the adventure of trekking.

Awash National Park

Is one of the National Parks of Ethiopia. Located at the southern tip of the Afar Region, this park is 225 kilometers east of Addis Ababa, with its southern boundary along the Awash River, and covers at least 756 square kilometers of acacia woodland and grassland.
The wildlife consists mainly of East African plains animals, such as Oryx, bat-eared fox, caracal, aardvark, colobus and green monkeys, Anubis and Hamadryas baboons, klipspringer, bushbuck,Soemmerings gazelle, kudu and 450 species of bird.